Air Traffic Control Association’s CMAC opens, fosters civil and military collaboration

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md., 30 Sept. 2014. Opportunities exist for collaboration between civil and military organizations to increase the safety and efficiency of air traffic management, recognizes Peter Dumont, president and CEO of the Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) during the association’s Civil/Military Aviation Conference (CMAC).

Air Traffic Control Association’s CMAC opens, fosters civil and military collaboration
Air Traffic Control Association’s CMAC opens, fosters civil and military collaboration

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md., 30 Sept. 2014. Opportunities exist for collaboration between civil and military organizations to increase the safety and efficiency of air traffic management, recognizes Peter Dumont, president and CEO of the Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) during the association’s Civil/Military Aviation Conference (CMAC).

Civil and military air traffic control experts are gathered at CMAC to add the coordination challenges of ensuring both civil and military organizations and aircraft have ready access to the National Airspace System (NAS).

“Improving collaboration is always a focus of Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) events,” affirms Dumont, who encourages CMAC attendees to explore both the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. Dumont stresses the need to balance civil aviation with defense airspace needs.

“That balance is not an easy one,” Dumont says. Many countries are experiencing tensions and conflict between civil and military agencies around airspace access. “We need to work together or the entire country suffers.

“Transportation is the backbone of both the national economy and an effective defense effort,” Dumont explains. “Transportation is essential for strong national defense, and a strong economy.” Policies that support both civil and military airspace needs are essential, and Dumont commends CMAC attendees for their coordinated efforts to make civil and military airspace management a priority.

Air Traffic Control Association’s CMAC opens, fosters civil and military collaborationAir Traffic Control Association’s CMAC opens, fosters civil and military collaborationPeter F. Dumont
President & CEO, Air Traffic Control Association

Peter Dumont came to ATCA as the President and CEO in 2006, with 30 years of aviation experience. He was recruited from Serco, a $2 billion global company, where he spent nine years in varying positions of increasing responsibility culminating with the role of Chief Operating Officer of North America. His lines of business included airport management, meteorology, air traffic management, fleet vehicle maintenance, air traffic control (ATC) engineering and installation, ATC, revenue collection, control tower fabrication, military base operations, and a number of Public Private Partnerships (PPP) with domestic and international governments. His market responsibilities included defense, federal civilian government, state and local government, PPP, and commercial.

Mr. Dumont is a retired Navy air traffic controller. He holds certifications in terminal, center, and carrier operations as well as being an ATC advanced school instructor. Additional ATC operational responsibilities included the management of 60 ATC towers in 13 states for the FAA under the contract tower program.

Today, as President & CEO of ATCA, he serves a membership of nearly 3,000 members in all aspects of the ATC/ATM community. ATCA is America’s premier forum for air traffic professionals; its roster of national and international events continues to draw global ATC leaders from industries, governments, and militaries throughout the world. Under Mr. Dumont’s leadership, the association’s key events — the Technical Symposium and the ATCA Annual Conference & Exposition — have grown significantly in attendance, quality, and content.

Mr. Dumont earned a Bachelor of Science in Professional Aeronautics and Master of Science in

Aviation/Aerospace Management, both from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He also serves as the secretary for the Aero Club of Washington.

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