CT scanning for carry-on luggage coming to Melbourne Airport security checkpoints

MELBOURNE, Austrailia – CT scanning technology is being installed to enhance security at the Melbourne Airport in Australia's second-largest city and second-busiest airport. Smiths Detection, based in London, United Kingdom, uses its HI-SCAN 6040 CTiX system to provide 3-D scans of the contents of passengers' carry-on baggage. Hundreds of images are taken to create 3D images in real-time, allowing for more accurate judgments on the bag contents. In the trial program at the Melbourne Airport, passengers will not have to remove large electronic devices, like laptop computers, from their carry-ons.

CT scanning for carry-on luggage coming to Melbourne Airport security checkpoints
CT scanning for carry-on luggage coming to Melbourne Airport security checkpoints
MELBOURNE, Austrailia –CT scanning technology is being installed to enhance security at the Melbourne Airport in Australia's second-largest city and second-busiest airport. Smiths Detection, based in London, United Kingdom, uses its HI-SCAN 6040 CTiX system to provide 3-D scans of the contents of passengers' carry-on baggage. Hundreds of images are taken to create 3D images in real-time, allowing for more accurate judgments on the bag contents. In the trial program at the Melbourne Airport, passengers will not have to remove large electronic devices, like laptop computers, from their carry-ons.

According to latest International Air Transport Association survey notes that travelers are most bothered by having to remove personal items from bags and having to remove electronic items from their carry-ons at 57 and 47 percent, respectively.

“Thanks to the pilot program we are able to better understand how in the future passengers can pass through security screening without having to divest their items, which simplifies the start of the traveller journey right from the outset. As Australia’s busiest 24/7 airport we will continue to find ways to implement new technology and upgrades that will improve the traveller experience from the road to the runway,” said Melbourne Airport Chief of Aviation Simon Gandy.

The CT scanning systems are expected to be installed in other large Australian airports in the future. CT scanning in the United States is also underway as the Transportation Security Administration operates machines at Boston Logan International, Phoenix Sky Harbor International, and JFK International airports and is poised to grow to other airports in the future. "Once fully developed for the aviation environment, checkpoint CT technology will deliver a significant advancement over today’s two-dimensional X-ray technology platforms," said TSA Administrator David P. Pekoske before the U.S. House of Representatives' Transportation and Protective Security Subcomittee earlier this year. "Checkpoint CT screening technology provides a three dimensional view of the bag and enables the TSA officer to rotate the bag 360 degrees to show the contents at every angle. CT features allow officers to virtually remove unwanted clutter, and greatly enhances their ability to visually inspect the contents of carry-on bags for explosives and prohibited items."

He continued, "My team has developed an aggressive plan to deploy checkpoint CT technology. We are currently pursuing a flexible approach to test, procure, and deploy CT systems, while concurrently developing CT system algorithms to significantly improve automated threat detection capabilities. This approach employs the concepts of modularity and iterative design to support deployment of specific capabilities as part of a larger solution, while progressively expanding functionality until the full CT capability is realized."

Related: Pilot program launched to allow visitors past security at Sea-Tac Airport

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