FAA reportedly didn’t review crucial safety assessments of Boeing 737 Max system before fatal crashes

The FAA’s internal probe of Boeing’s 737 Max approval process has reportedly found that officials failed to review key safety assessments of the MCAS system that was later implicated in two fatal crashes, reports Emma Newburger for CNBC.

737 Max

WASHINGTON - The Federal Aviation Administration’s internal probe of Boeing’s 737 Max approval process has reportedly found that senior agency officials failed to review key safety assessments of the plane’s flight-control system that was later implicated in two fatal crashes, reports Emma Newburger for CNBC. Continue reading original article.


The Intelligent Aerospace take: May 16, 2019- Boeing's 737 MAX have been grounded since March as the aerospace giant looks to implement a software fix to its MCAS system that is thought to be the cause of a pair of deadly crashes in fewer than six months. The Wall Street Journal first reported on preliminary findings that the FAA failed to review safety assessments of the flight control system implicated in the crashes. In addition, it was found that Boeing did not label the MCAS system in which a malfunction could result in disaster. 

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Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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