FAA misled Congress on inspector training for Boeing 737 Max, investigators say

Safety inspectors who worked on training requirements for Boeing 737 Max pilots were themselves “underqualified,” writes Michael Laris for the Washington Post.

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WASHINGTON - Investigators examining a whistleblower complaint have concluded that safety inspectors who worked on training requirements for Boeing 737 Max pilots were themselves “underqualified” — and that the Federal Aviation Administration provided misleading information about the issue to Congress, writes Michael Laris for the Washington PostContinue reading original article

The Intelligent Aerospace take:

September 24, 2019-In a letter to President Trump yesterday, Special Counsel Henry J. Kerner wrote that the “FAA’s official responses to Congress appear to have been misleading in their portrayal of FAA employee training and competency.”

“The FAA is entrusted with the critically important role of ensuring aircraft safety,” Kerner added in a statement. “The FAA’s failure to ensure safety inspector competency for these aircraft puts the flying public at risk.”

The Post wrote that the information provided by the FAA "obfuscates" concerns and “diverts attention away from the likely truth of the matter: that they were neither qualified under agency policy to certify pilots flying the 737 Max nor to assess pilot training on procedures and maneuvers.”

Related: FAA chief to test out changes to Boeing 737 Max software in simulator

Related: U.S. might approve the 737 MAX to fly — but will the world follow?

Related: A former Boeing official is pleading the Fifth Amendment after being subpoenaed for documents in the US Justice Department's probe of the 737 Max

Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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