In reversal, Boeing recommends 737 Max simulator training for pilots

The company had long maintained that the training wasn’t needed to fly the plane, which was grounded after two deadly crashes, write By Natalie Kitroeff and David Gelles for the New York Times.

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NEW YORK - From its inception, Boeing’s 737 Max was designed to save airlines the expense of training their pilots on flight simulators. During the initial approval of the plane and after two crashes killed 346 people last year, Boeing argued in conversations with the Federal Aviation Administration that simulator training was not necessary, write By Natalie Kitroeff and David Gelles for the New York TimesContinue reading original article

The Intelligent Aerospace take:

January 8, 2020 -This recommendation takes into account our unstinting commitment to the safe return of service as well as changes to the airplane and test results," Boeing wrote in release about its decision to recommend additional flight simulator training. "Final determination will be established by the regulators."

“Safety is Boeing’s top priority," said interim Boeing CEO Greg Smith. "Public, customer and stakeholder confidence in the 737 MAX is critically important to us and with that focus Boeing has decided to recommend MAX simulator training combined with computer-based training for all pilots prior to returning the MAX safely to service.”

Related: After Boeing halts Max production, suppliers wait for fallout

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Related: FAA chief says Boeing 737 Max recertification process to stretch into 2020

Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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