Boeing expects 737 Max software fix by end of March

SEATTLE, Wash., - Boeing has told airlines it expects to have new software for its 737 Max plane ready by the end of the month. The plane has been grounded following the Ethiopian Airlines aircraft crash earlier this month. Documents seen by the BBC confirm that the software update will limit the operation of the controversial MCAS system. That was the same system used by a Lion Air 737 Max which crashed off the coast of Indonesia last year. Investigators say there are "clear similarities" between the two, reports the BBC.

First meeting of agencies from international organizations reviewing Boeing 737 MAX to take place April 29; DOT announces members of a special committee investigating the aircraft certification process
First meeting of agencies from international organizations reviewing Boeing 737 MAX to take place April 29; DOT announces members of a special committee investigating the aircraft certification process
SEATTLE, Wash., - Boeing has told airlines it expects to have new software for its 737 Max plane ready by the end of the month. The plane has been grounded following the Ethiopian Airlines aircraft crash earlier this month. Documents seen by the BBC confirm that the software update will limit the operation of the controversial MCAS system. That was the same system used by a Lion Air 737 Max which crashed off the coast of Indonesia last year. Investigators say there are "clear similarities" between the two, reports the BBC.

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The Intelligent Aerospace take:

March 21, 2019-While Boeing expects its software update to be ready to be delivered by the end of March, it is unclear how long the 737 MAX passenger jets will be grounded.

The software upgrade “will be deployed across the 737 MAX fleet in the coming weeks. “This includes updates to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) flight control law, pilot displays, operation manuals and crew training,” Boeing officials say.

Related: Former Delta executive Steve Dickson expected to be tapped to be Trump's newest head of Federal Aviation Administration; Department of Transportation asks for audit of 737 MAX certification

Related: Boeing agrees with NTSB and FAA to temporarily ground 737 MAX models; President Trump issues executive order

Related: The Boeing 737 MAX: Is the problem with the plane or the pilots?

Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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