Commercial aircraft can tolerate radio signals from portable electronics, says PED Aviation Rulemaking Committee

WASHINGTON, 31 Oct. 2013. The Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA’s) Portable Elecronic Device (PED) Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) has concluded that most commercial airplanes can tolerate radio interference signals from portable electronic devices (PEDs).

PED
PED

WASHINGTON, 31 Oct. 2013. The Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA’s) Portable Elecronic Device (PED) Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) has concluded that most commercial airplanes can tolerate radio interference signals from portable electronic devices (PEDs).

In a recent report, PED ARC officials recommended that the FAA provide airlines with new procedures to assess if their airplanes can tolerate radio interference from PEDs.

Shutterstock Tablet Air

Once an airline verifies the tolerance of its fleet, it can allow passengers to use handheld, lightweight electronic devices—such as tablets, e-readers, and smartphones—at all altitudes. In rare instances of low-visibility, the crew will instruct passengers to turn off their devices during landing. The group also recommended that heavier devices should be safely stowed under seats or in overhead bins during takeoff and landing.

The FAA is streamlining the approval of expanded PED use by giving airlines updated, clear guidance. This FAA tool will help airlines assess the risks of potential PED-induced avionics problems for their airplanes and specific operations. Airlines will evaluate avionics as well as changes to stowage rules and passenger announcements. Each airline will also need to revise manuals, checklists for crewmember training materials, carry-on baggage programs and passenger briefings before expanding use of PEDs. Each airline will determine how and when they will allow passengers broader use of PEDs.

The FAA did not consider changing the regulations regarding the use of cell phones for voice communications during flight because the issue is under the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The ARC did recommend that the FAA consult with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to review its current rules. Cell phones differ from most PEDs in that they are designed to send out signals strong enough to be received at great distances.

iPadiPad

Current FAA regulations require an aircraft operator to determine that radio-frequency interference from PEDs is not a flight safety risk before the operator authorizes them for use during certain phases of flight. Even PEDs that do not intentionally transmit signals can emit unintentional radio energy. This energy may affect aircraft safety because the signals can occur at the same frequencies used by the plane’s highly sensitive communications, navigation, flight control and electronic equipment. An airline must show it can prevent potential interference that could pose a safety hazard. The PED ARC report helps the FAA to guide airlines through determining that they can safely allow widespread use of PEDs.

The PED ARC began work in January, at the request of Administrator Huerta, to determine if it is safe to allow more widespread use of electronic devices in today’s aircraft. The group also reviewed the public’s comments in response to an August 2012 FAA notice on current policy, guidance, and procedures that aircraft operators use when determining if passengers can use PEDs. The group did not consider the use of electronic devices for voice communications.

Follow Avionics Intelligence news updates on Twitter (@Avionics_Intel), LinkedIn, and Google+.

PED images courtesy Shutterstock.

More in Commercial