Today is your last chance to comment on proposed FAA rule changes for professional drone operators to fly at night, over people, and beyond visual line of sight

WASHINGTON - The Federal Aviation Administration is soliciting comments from the public regarding the allowance of small UAS to be operated over people "in certain conditions and operations of small UAS at night without obtaining a waiver." UAS giant DJI is urging additional comments as the FAA has received fewer than 60 regarding those specific issues since the proposed rule change was made Feb. 13.

Today is your last chance to comment on proposed FAA rule changes for professional drone operators to fly at night, over people, and beyond visual line of sight
Today is your last chance to comment on proposed FAA rule changes for professional drone operators to fly at night, over people, and beyond visual line of sight
WASHINGTON - The Federal Aviation Administration is soliciting comments from the public regarding the allowance of small UAS to be operated over people "in certain conditions and operations of small UAS at night without obtaining a waiver." UAS giant DJI is urging additional comments as the FAA has received fewer than 60 regarding those specific issues since the proposed rule change was made Feb. 13.

Drone professionals know society has barely tapped the potential of this transformative technology, and we appreciate the FAA’s willingness to listen to the voices of people who use drones every day as they craft these necessary rules,” said Brendan Schulman, DJI Vice President of Policy & Legal Affairs. “Given how vital these rules are for every professional drone pilot in America, it is surprising to see how few comments have been received. We strongly encourage professional drone operators and fleet operators to read the FAA’s proposals and submit their perspectives on how to ensure drones can handle expanded responsibilities safely.”

The Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) can be reviewed at this link and includes possible restrictions on safe and secure drone operation, including standoff distances from drone operations, performance limits for drones, how UTM should operate, payload restrictions and critical system design requirements.

“The FAA is asking many good questions about how best to ensure that drones remain a safe addition to the airspace as they are allowed to perform more types of complex operations,” said David Hansell, DJI Public Policy Manager. “Professional drone operators should seize this opportunity to have a say in the rules that will govern how and whether they can use expanded capabilities to achieve great things with drones.”

To review the full proposal, and to submit a comment, please visit this webpage.

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