Navy researchers order FPGA boards from Annapolis Micro Systems for CoreFire tools

WASHINGTON, 11 Sept. 2013. U.S. Navy researches are ordering a variety of embedded computing hardware from Annapolis Micro Systems Inc. in Annapolis, Md., that is compatible with the Annapolis Micro Systems proprietary CoreFire development environment under terms of three contracts awarded on 7 Sept.

Posted by John Keller
Posted by John Keller

WASHINGTON, 11 Sept. 2013. U.S. Navy researches are ordering a variety of embedded computing hardware from Annapolis Micro Systems Inc. in Annapolis, Md., that is compatible with the Annapolis Micro Systems proprietary CoreFire development environment under terms of three contracts awarded on 7 Sept.

Officials of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington are buying several kinds of the Annapolis Micro Systems WILD family of field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based processor boards in three separate orders placed on 7 Sept. worth a total of $328,817.

The boards will support Navy research in disciplines such as digital signal processing (DSP), radar processing, signals intelligence (SIGINT), and electronic intelligence (ELINT).

The CoreFire suite of design and development tools from Annapolis Micro Systems enables engineers to program FPGAs via a data-flow graphical user interface. The tool enables designers to implement algorithms on the company's WILD family of FPGA boards without descending to the lower-level hardware details, which can save months of development time and money, Annapolis Micro Systems officials say.

CoreFire can help Navy researchers derive reconfigurable designs for FPGA boards with millions of gates. CoreFire's drag-and-drop approach helps engineers concentrate on relatively high levels of abstraction in the design process, and frees them from gate-level design.

Much of NRL's work that involves CoreFire and WILD FPGA boards from Annapolis Micro Systems revolves around electronic warfare (EW). NRL experts are looking to shorten the design cycles that go with hand coding in the VHSIC Hardware Design Language (VHDL).

For more information contact Annapolis Micro Systems online at www.annapmicro.com, or the Naval Research Laboratory at www.nrl.navy.mil.

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