787 Dreamliner pilot training starts with All Nippon Airways pilots

SEATTLE, 27 April 2011. All Nippon Airways (ANA) pilots have begun flight training on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft. Ten pilots from ANA, the launch operator for the 787, began the training program with classroom instructions in Tokyo, which followed with training on simulation devices at the Boeing Flight Services training campus in Seattle. First delivery of the 787 is scheduled for the third quarter of this year.

Apr 27th, 2011
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Posted by John McHaleSEATTLE, 27 April 2011. All Nippon Airways (ANA) pilots have begun flight training on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft. Ten pilots from ANA, the launch operator for the 787, began the training program with classroom instructions in Tokyo, which followed with training on simulation devices at the Boeing Flight Services training campus in Seattle. First delivery of the 787 is scheduled for the third quarter of this year.The Boeing 787 flight training program uses a suite of training devices including a full-flight simulator, flight training device, and desktop simulation station to ensure that pilots are ready to fly the Dreamliner. The 787 full-flight simulator includes dual head-up displays (HUDs) and electronic flight bags (EFBs). The simulator is designed to train pilots to become proficient in visual maneuvers, instrument landing system (ILS) and non-ILS approaches, missed approaches using integrated approach navigation, non-normal procedures with emphasis on those affecting handling characteristics, and wind shear and rejected takeoff training."The start of customer training is an exciting milestone on any new airplane program," says Sherry Carbary, vice president, Boeing Flight Services. "In the case of the 787 Dreamliner, we're seeing the results of a special working relationship between Boeing and ANA. We worked side by side with ANA for more than four years conducting simulator evaluations, curriculum reviews and cross-training so that each team learned from the other. It has truly been a collaboration between committed individuals dedicated to ensuring success."With the 787 pilot training courses, pilots can transition to the new airplane in five to 20 days, depending on pilot experience. Boeing 777 pilots can qualify to fly the 787 in as little as five days, given the high level of commonality between the two airplane types."This is a significant milestone for our company," says Hideyuki Shibuichi, senior vice president of Flight Operations for ANA. "Getting our pilots trained and prepared is essential to being ready to take delivery of the airplane later this year."In order to bring training closer to customers around the world, Boeing has installed a network of eight 787 training suites at five global campuses -- Seattle, Singapore, Tokyo, London Gatwick, and Shanghai.
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