Globalization drives growing need for data security on mobile devices

Globalization is driving the need for significant change in business processes and models, as well as changing how and where data is stored, accessed, and secured. As workforces become increasingly mobile, users are demanding ever greater flexibility in accessing data.

Nov 29th, 2012
Smartphone data security
Smartphone data security

Globalization is driving the need for significant change in business processes and models, as well as changing how and where data is stored, accessed, and secured. As workforces become increasingly mobile, users are demanding ever greater flexibility in accessing data.

Many organizations have reacted against bringing the proverbial “Trojan Horse” into their IT environment by implementing draconian policies that sacrifice productivity for the sake of security. The consequences of such can limit value creation and leads to frustration by both IT and knowledge workers that ultimately lessen an organization’s defenses.

The more the world becomes interconnected, the further the network extends beyond the secure and protected control of corporate IT with ever greater benefits available through proactively building corporate IT policies to empower the dynamic workforce.

An increasingly mobile workforce--while bringing benefits of flexibility, mobility, and agility--adds even more complexity to the situation. It is one thing to protect a physical infrastructure, yet quite another to ensure the security of one having constantly moving walls.

In order to ensure a secure, yet flexible, geographically dispersed work environment, data security needs to be controlled through remote end-point policy management to properly manage data sprawl, virtual desktop infrastructure, and home directories to ensure that the right information is available in the right place at the right time.

Solutions, such as GridSync, Tarmin’s local-to-the-cloud replication technology, allow centralized, policy-based control of local data volumes, encryption, and compression on a wide range of smart devices and end points. When users gain a secure agent with Active Directory integrated authentication for sharing and collaborating with unstructured data while simultaneously protecting the home directories in the corporate data center the entire organization benefits from improved business agility with strong compliance, legal, and commercial risk control.

Organizations can build networks that are virtually impenetrable to the outside world. Yet, the greatest risk is unknowing exposure from within. Learning the lessons of the Trojans’ demise is only half the battle. Balancing the challenges of minimizing the attack surface and ensuring a highly responsive business infrastructure in today’s highly globalized world takes a solution that protects home directory data in the corporate data center, while allowing the mobile workforce to access business-critical information from any remote location on any smart device. This is the type of usage policy that today’s businesses must address to ensure effective and balanced data protection.

About the author

Shahbaz Ali is an entrepreneur and strategic executive manager with more than 20 years' experience creating dynamic solutions for enterprises. Shahbaz serves as the public face of Tarmin and brings the vigor and experience of a seasoned entrepreneur with a history of successful companies. Shahbaz oversees all core business activities, including marketing, partnership development, and sales at Tarmin. Shahbaz is the creator of the company’s award-winning GridBank product.

Prior to co-founding Tarmin, Shahbaz worked for innovative startups and market-leading companies that include Invensys, Alcatel-Lucent, Mastercard, and Mondex. He played a key role in the acquisition of Mondex which, at the time, was the largest acquisition of a European startup company. Shahbaz holds a BSc(Hons) in Software Engineering from London Southbank University and has completed a PhD course of study in Software Requirements Engineering from the Open University.

Images courtesy Shuttertock.

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