Sensor detects and melts ice from ground-based avionics and airport facilities

FORT LAUDERDALE Fla., 7 June 2009. New Avionics Corp. in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., is introducing a self-defrosting ice sensor for detecting formation of ice on ground-based avionics systems and mission-critical airport facilities.

FORT LAUDERDALE Fla., 7 June 2009. New Avionics Corp. in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., is introducing a self-defrosting ice sensor for detecting formation of ice on ground-based avionics systems and mission-critical airport facilities.

The Ice*Meister Model 9734-HTR self defrosting industrial ice detecting sensor system detects ice buildup on webcams and walkways, radio towers, oil wells, weather stations, power stations, telescopes, bridges, blimps, and remote inaccessible unmanned facilities.

Ice sensitivity is adjustable to thinner than 0.001 inch. Pulsing 1.2 amps at 24 volts DC, Model 9734-HTR's radiant heater heats the sensor probe and melts ice.

A resistance heater and thermal switch are affixed to each heater panel inside the solid sensor head. Insulating epoxy potting compound assures maximum radiant heat for the optical sensor probe. Temperatures of the ice-melting aluminum heater panels are limited to 50 degrees Celsius for personnel safety.

Heater control can be set for least ice threshold or least energy consumption. While operating, system allows the host ice-control system to cycle back-and-forth across the threshold of ice formation in real time; prevent protected facilities from accumulating ice, and use the least amount of energy to do it.

The system consists of three parts: an Ice*Meister optical sensor head with radiant heater option, and two lightweight shielded blue cables of four AWG 24 color coded wires, which connect the sensor head to the interface.

The cables operate down to -70 C. The 9733 interface is housed in a DIN rail box with screw terminals. For more information contact New Avionics online at www.newavionics.com.

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