Docs show Navy got 'UFO' patent granted by warning of similar Chinese tech advances

The patents describes a "hybrid aerospace-underwater craft" claimed to be capable of truly extraordinary feats of speed and maneuverability in air, water, and outer space alike thanks to a revolutionary electromagnetic propulsion system.

The U.S. Navy’s maritime patrol and reconnaissance test aircraft P-8A Poseidon flies with a P-3C Orion along side, prior to landing at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.
The U.S. Navy’s maritime patrol and reconnaissance test aircraft P-8A Poseidon flies with a P-3C Orion along side, prior to landing at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.
Navy photo by Liz Goettee
NAS PATUXENT RIVER , Md. - The United States Secretary of Navy is listed as the assignee on several radical aviation technologies patented by an aerospace engineer working at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) headquarters in Patuxent River, Maryland. One of these patents describes a "hybrid aerospace-underwater craft" claimed to be capable of truly extraordinary feats of speed and maneuverability in air, water, and outer space alike thanks to a revolutionary electromagnetic propulsion system. Sound far fetched? You’re not alone, write Brett Tingley and Tyler Rogoway for The Drive. Continue reading original article

The Intelligent Aerospace take:

July 1, 2019-To say the patent Dr. Pais was awarded is interesting would be underselling it by a few orders of magnitude. In The Drive's piece digging into the "UFO" show that the patent claims the craft can "engineer the fabric of our reality at the most fundamental level."

Ignoring the inertia and mass of an aircraft while it is traveling isn't a thing that can be done in physics - at least in our current understanding of science - but patents don't necessarily have to in production or even be possible to be granted. So, Tingley and Rogoway ask why the CTO of the Naval Aviation Enterprise, Dr. James Sheehy, would vouch for the application to the patent office after the patent was reject the first time around? Well, because according to Dr. Sheehy, China is also working on the technology and it would be advantageous for the U.S. to hold the patent as he predicts the technology "will become a reality."

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Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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