Marion Blakey leaves Aerospace Industries Association

ARLINGTON, Va., 24 Feb. 2015. Marion C. Blakey, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), is leaving her post of the past seven years to assume the position of president and CEO of Rolls Royce North America.

ARLINGTON, Va., 24 Feb. 2015. Marion C. Blakey, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), is leaving her post of the past seven years to assume the position of president and CEO of Rolls Royce North America.
ARLINGTON, Va., 24 Feb. 2015. Marion C. Blakey, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), is leaving her post of the past seven years to assume the position of president and CEO of Rolls Royce North America.

ARLINGTON, Va., 24 Feb. 2015. Marion C. Blakey, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), is leaving her post of the past seven years to assume the position of president and CEO of Rolls Royce North America.

ARLINGTON, Va., 24 Feb. 2015. Marion C. Blakey, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), is leaving her post of the past seven years to assume the position of president and CEO of Rolls Royce North America.ARLINGTON, Va., 24 Feb. 2015. Marion C. Blakey, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), is leaving her post of the past seven years to assume the position of president and CEO of Rolls Royce North America.

“Under Marion’s guidance, AIA has elevated its role advocating in the best interests of the nation and the aerospace and defense industry,” says David L. Joyce, AIA chairman and president and CEO of GE Aviation.

Blakey’s tenure, which began in Nov. 2007, saw the achievement of numerous milestones for the industry, according to a spokesperson. AIA’s advocacy played a key role in changing the classification of commercial satellites in 2014, enabling American manufacturers to better compete in the global market. AIA’s work in support of the Next Generation Air Transportation System has been widely recognized by industry and government.

In defense, Blakey led the establishment of a broad-ranging campaign to alert elected officials and the general public of the significant impact to our nation and the aerospace and defense industry of sequestration and budget cuts imposed under the Budget Control Act of 2011. The Association has also used social media to increase the public’s appreciation of the importance of a strong aerospace industry, including NASA’s achievements.

“I’m very proud of AIA’s record of achievement these last seven years,” Blakey says. “I’d like to thank AIA’s Executive Committee, Board of Governors and the entire staff for their guidance, hard work and commitment. I strongly believe we’ve strengthened AIA and better positioned the organization and our member companies to inform and influence the debate on key issues facing our country and our industry in the coming years.”

“While we’re quickly moving forward to identify Marion’s successor,” Joyce said, “AIA has outstanding and dedicated staff who play a key role in AIA’s mission of driving the aerospace industry’s agenda and priorities. And those priorities remain clear: to advocate strongly for sound policy, sensible regulation and adequate budgets that support the necessary investments in our defense, civil aviation and space sectors to ensure that America’s aerospace and defense industry remains second to none.”

More in Military