Team closes in on 'holy grail' of room temperature quantum computing chips

Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology (SIT) have coaxed photons into interacting with one another with unprecedented efficiency, writes Thania Benios for SIT.

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HOBOKEN, N.J. - To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the other. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology (SIT) have coaxed photons into interacting with one another with unprecedented efficiency—a key advance toward realizing long-awaited quantum optics technologies for computing, communication and remote sensing, writes Thania Benios for SIT. Continue reading original article

The Intelligent Aerospace take:

September 20, 2019-"We're pushing the boundaries of physics and optical engineering in order to bring quantum and all-optical signal processing closer to reality," said Yuping Huang, an associate professor of physics and director of the Center for Quantum Science and Engineering at SIT.

Huang's team utilized a track-shaped micro-cavity carved into crystal. There, photons interacted with each other which produced a harmonic resonance, causing some of the light to change its wavelength. This isn't an entirely new method, but the SIT researchers utilized a chip made from lithium niobate, which interacts with light in a novel way, and boosted efficiency by using it. Using the "racetrack," the Stephens team aims to better confine and recirculate light and ultimately generate interactions at the single-photon level reliably.

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Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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