Changing how we build satellites could do more than reduce space junk

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., – "Space is for everyone" is a popular saying, but it rarely holds true — partly because space is expensive, and partly because certain countries have decades of a head start and established procedures to rely on. Rethinking those established procedures, however, could address not just inequity, but other looming challenges in space exploration as well. That's the argument that powers the research of Danielle Wood, who runs a program at MIT's Media Lab, which focuses on how to do things in space that further equity and justice on Earth, reports Meghan Bartels for Space.com.

Jan 24th, 2019
Harpoon successfully captures space debris
Harpoon successfully captures space debris
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., – "Space is for everyone" is a popular saying, but it rarely holds true — partly because space is expensive, and partly because certain countries have decades of a head start and established procedures to rely on. Rethinking those established procedures, however, could address not just inequity, but other looming challenges in space exploration as well. That's the argument that powers the research of Danielle Wood, who runs a program at MIT's Media Lab, which focuses on how to do things in space that further equity and justice on Earth, reports Meghan Bartels for Space.com.

Continue reading original article

The Intelligent Aerospace take:

January 24, 2019-Meghan Bartels' story with MIT's Danielle Wood dives into a bit of history involving early space programs and the long-lasting ramifications of "space junk." More importantly, Bartels writes about how the future satellites could be made in space by 3D printers and truly make space "for everyone" by allowing less-established spacefaring countries put technology to work to solve their problems. It paints the future of technology as a more egalitarian one than currently exists.

Related: SpaceX delivers final 10 Iridium NEXT satellites to low earth orbit

Related: Virgin has successful test with 747 carrying air-launched satellite delivery rocket

Related: You are here: first Lockheed Martin-built next generation GPS III satellite responds to commands

Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

Ready to make a purchase? Search the Intelligent Aerospace Buyer's Guide for companies, new products, press releases, and videos

More in SATCOM