China and the next space race

TULSA, Okla., – The space race is on again. In 2003, China sent its first astronauts into orbit around the earth. Since then, China has slowly and resolutely expanded its space program, increasing its clout as an aerospace powerhouse, and a challenger to the space programs of the U.S., Russia, and the European Union. According to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) annual report to Congress on Chinese military developments, China’s military space program “continues to mature rapidly.” Most recently, China made history by landing a craft on the dark side of the moon, a feat never before accomplished, writes James Durso for Real Clear Defense.

China and the next space race
China and the next space race
TULSA, Okla., – The space race is on again. In 2003, China sent its first astronauts into orbit around the earth. Since then, China has slowly and resolutely expanded its space program, increasing its clout as an aerospace powerhouse, and a challenger to the space programs of the U.S., Russia, and the European Union. According to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) annual report to Congress on Chinese military developments, China’s military space program “continues to mature rapidly.” Most recently, China made history by landing a craft on the dark side of the moon, a feat never before accomplished, writes James Durso for Real Clear Defense.

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The Intelligent Aerospace take:

January 23, 2019-With China ramping up its space program to rival traditional powers like the United States, Russia, and the European Union, James Durso notes that the ascendant Asian power could produce a threat to American sovereignty and calls for allocating more of the federal budget to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Currently, NASA receives around one half of one percent of federal budget. Durso argues that a return to a Reagan-era "peace through strength" strategy and a build up of space capabilities through public and private investment. A "Space Race 2.0" could help not only the U.S. secure its footing above the atmosphere, it could also help drive innovation and prove a boon to companies that produce components for aerospace applications.

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Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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