TT multispectral electro-optical imaging system launched aboard GeoEye-1 satellite

ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- Satellite operators at GeoEye Inc. in Dulles, Va., needed a color and black-and-white imaging system for the GeoEye-1 imaging satellite, which launched into orbit around the Earth's poles in September from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. They found their solution from the ITT Corp. Space Systems Division in Rochester, N.Y.

ROCHESTER, N.Y., 8 Sept. 2008. Satellite operators at GeoEye Inc. in Dulles, Va., needed a multispectral imaging system for the GeoEye-1 imaging satellite, which launched into polar Earth orbit in September from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. They found their solution from the ITT Corp. Space Systems Division in Rochester, N.Y.

GeoEye-1 will orbit the Earth's poles to capture detailed digital images, and can revisit any point on Earth once every three days or sooner. The satellite was built by General Dynamics in Gilbert, Ariz.


This simulation shows the resolution capability of the GeoEye-1 imaging satellite

The satellite collects images at 0.41-meter panchromatic (black and white) and 1.65-meter multispectral (color) resolution, and can precisely locate an object to within three meters of its true location on the Earth's surface.

The satellite will also be able to collect up to 700,000 square kilometers of panchromatic imagery per day for large-scale mapping projects.

ITT's Space Systems Division was selected in October 2004 to build the imaging system for the GeoEye-1 satellite, which is partially sponsored by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency though its NextView program. ITT's integrated electro-optical payload includes the sensor subsystem, optical telescope unit and outer barrel assembly. The system was delivered in January 2007 for integration into the spacecraft.

Last October, ITT was selected to develop and supply a third-generation 0.25-meter imaging system for GeoEye-2, scheduled for launch in 2011. For more information contact ITT Space Systems online at www.ssd.itt.com.


How the GeoEye-1 satellite works on orbit

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