DJI equipping new consumer drones with airplane and helicopter detectors

As part of a 10-point plan to “ensure the world’s skies remain safe in the drone era,” DJI has announced that it will install airplane and helicopter detectors in new consumer drones, according to AUVSI.

May 28th, 2019
Dji Drone
SHENZHEN, China - As part of a 10-point plan to “ensure the world’s skies remain safe in the drone era,” DJI has announced that it will install airplane and helicopter detectors in new consumer drones. AirSense technology, which receives ADS-B signals from nearby airplanes and helicopters and warns UAS pilots if they appear to be on a collision course, will be integrated into all new DJI drone models released after January 1, 2020 that weigh more than 250 grams (8.8 ounces), according to AUVSI.com. Continue reading original article

The Intelligent Aerospace take:

May 28, 2019-UAS giant DJI will add another layer of safety to its unmanned systems weighing more than 8.8 ounces (250 grams) to detect other, larger flying machines like airplanes and helicopters from miles away - further than a UAS pilot can hear or see them.

“Expanding the availability of AirSense to DJI pilots is a meaningful step forward in safely integrating UAS and reducing conflicts with manned aircraft,” says Rune Duke, senior director of Airspace and Air Traffic at the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. “ADS-B In is used daily by thousands of pilots to increase their situational awareness and ensure safe operations. As the general aviation fleet further equips with ADS-B Out and other NextGen technology, enhancements like AirSense will allow all pilots to maximize their investment. All of aviation will benefit from the incorporation of this technology into DJI's large fleet.”

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Jamie Whitney, Associate Editor
Intelligent Aerospace

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