NASA selects Ohio non-profit to manage unmanned air challenge

WASHINGTON, 10 May 2013. NASA officials have selected Development Projects Inc. of Dayton, Ohio, to manage its new Centennial Challenge prize competition related to unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in 2014.

May 10th, 2013
NASA
NASA

WASHINGTON, 10 May 2013. NASA officials have selected Development Projects Inc. of Dayton, Ohio, to manage its new Centennial Challenge prize competition related to unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in 2014.

NASA's Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Airspace Operations Challenge is focused on developing and demonstrating key technologies, particularly the ability to sense and avoid other air traffic—making it possible for robotic aircraft to operate safely in the same airspace as piloted aircraft. NASA is providing a $500,000 prize purse.

Unmanned aircraft systems have the potential to carry out a wide range of public service tasks that are too expensive, monotonous or dangerous for piloted aircraft. Robotic aircraft can carry instruments into violent hurricanes and monitor remote stretches of infrastructure, such as power lines and pipelines. First responders can use UAS platforms to assess flood damage and wildfire intensity.

The NASA Aeronautics Research Institute at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., is coordinating agency participation in the challenge on behalf of NASA's Space Technology and Aeronautics Research mission directorates.

Development Projects Inc. was selected from proposals submitted in response to a NASA solicitation in fall 2012. The non-profit organization will finalize rules and begin detailed preparations for the challenge, eventually registering competitors. The first competition to demonstrate team entries is expected in May 2014.

NASA's Centennial Challenges seek unconventional solutions to problems of interest to NASA and the nation. Competitors have included private companies, student groups, and independent inventors working outside the traditional aerospace industry. Unlike contracts or grants, prizes are awarded only after solutions are successfully demonstrated.

There have been 23 Centennial Challenges competition events since 2005. NASA has awarded almost $6 million to 15 challenge-winning teams. For more information about the Centennial Challenges program and descriptions of each of the challenge competitions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/challenges

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